Music Supervisor Spotlight: PJ Bloom 


As the wave of using independent music in TV is at its all-time high, it is inevitable that this wave will come crashing down on the surface of change. Some music supervisors have taken a stance on the current practices of music supervision in television as a promotional tool. One of these music supervisors is PJ Bloom. (You may know him recently from his work on Glee and The New Normal, however he has been around quite awhile working on movies such as Cruel Intentions.) Talking to an audience in the UK recently, PJ voiced how he is “shocked” that TV studios still pay labels to use music. His argument illuminates the idea of music rights owners paying for the right to synch their music with picture.
This artist exposure argument applies to radio not paying labels in compensation for promoting artists. Bloom believes this same idea should be applied to his field.
It is getting to the point now where music used in TV, commercials, film, and video games are making it or breaking it for no-name bands. Many of these bands can thank music supervisors for their careers. So the question is….should artists pay for play?



Digital Music News 



-Lindsey Znosko · #music #music supervision #Music Supervisor #TV #film #video games #music news #Glee #The New Normal #Cruel Intentions #Music Business #PJ Bloom
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Music Supervisor Spotlight: PJ Bloom 


As the wave of using independent music in TV is at its all-time high, it is inevitable that this wave will come crashing down on the surface of change. Some music supervisors have taken a stance on the current practices of music supervision in television as a promotional tool. One of these music supervisors is PJ Bloom. (You may know him recently from his work on Glee and The New Normal, however he has been around quite awhile working on movies such as Cruel Intentions.) Talking to an audience in the UK recently, PJ voiced how he is “shocked” that TV studios still pay labels to use music. His argument illuminates the idea of music rights owners paying for the right to synch their music with picture.
This artist exposure argument applies to radio not paying labels in compensation for promoting artists. Bloom believes this same idea should be applied to his field.
It is getting to the point now where music used in TV, commercials, film, and video games are making it or breaking it for no-name bands. Many of these bands can thank music supervisors for their careers. So the question is….should artists pay for play?
Digital Music News 
-Lindsey Znosko
Posted:
1 year ago
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